#UKSNOW gives way to #UKFLOODS

17 01 2010

With the inevitability of Simon Cowel’s next awful superstar (or RATM gaining a few hundred thousand purchasers of their records who will never play it let alone ever buy another one) we find our selves on the verge of #UKSNOW giving way to #UKFLOODS.

Here at Redwood the snow has almost completely melted, the lake has a thin covering of broken ice over most of it but its melting fast. The swans and ducks look a little happier about getting their habitat back. The lake often rises quite a bit after heavy rain and over our time here I would say we have seen it crawl up the bank by 2 to 3 feet. But the lake is not really the concern, the Loddon is.

The Loddon floods every year, certainly every year I have lived in this part of Berkshire I have read or seen it flood, with quite often disastrous results for some. Just before Christmas the following Flood Warning was issued, as far as I know its still in place. It did seem amusing to drive past the cinema and see people’s cars under water, not for the owners though I suspect.

The snow certainly caused chaos here over the last 10 days but the snow melt arriving is going to be worse. You can check flood warnings with the Environment Agency web site.

I will be keeping an eye on the local warnings, though thankfully we are high enough to not have to worry about it effecting us directly, at least for now

It seems the BBC has us down for another snow fall mid week, according to their forecast

Redwood Weather

Posted via email from Steve’s Blog

Advertisements




#uksnow – Snow and the Weather Station

8 01 2010

As every one not living under a rock will know the UK has been hit by quite a lot of snow in the last week. Here at Redwood we still have 8 to 10 inches laying on the ground, now frozen as we have not see a temperature above freezing for a few days.

I’ve been watching the weather station sensors of my WS2350 out on the roof outside my office windows and its stood remarkably well to its second winter in the snow. The wind speed anemometer has not frozen and has continued to provide good readings, The temperature, pressure and humidity have provided readings as accurate as they are ever going to be and well with in the margin of error when cross checked with other local weather stations. In fact only the rain sensor lets the side down a little by having no way to distinguish between snow melt and rain fall, hardly the sensors fault I know, but it does raise the question of how one avoids measuring snow melt in the rain fall stats. Its also bound to suffer from frozen water on the tipper which when it melts will add to rain fall stats too, less of a snow issue, more a freezing temperature issue.

I was also thinking about how to deal with recording snow fall, both depth and rate. Obviously there is no sensor to record this automatically (that I am aware of) so one would need to take manual readings and record these. The excellent Cumulus software (www.sandaysoft.com) I use as my data logger and web site feeder has provision for a weather diary in which snow conditions can be recored but it does not seem like the standard Cumulus site presents this diary. Of course snow fall is one thing, sunshine is another and lightning strike, both of which can be measured by the amateur using available sensors and software. Snow, it would seem, is not so easy to measure with automation.

There was an excellent series of weather programs on the BBC Four earlier this year, The Weather (www.bbc.co.uk), in four parts. One of which covered snow in some detail. I was hoping there may be a repeat showing but I cant find them.

The excellent #uksnow twitter tag mashup by Ben Marsh (uksnow.benmarsh.co.uk) has been incredibly popular again, showing a simple picture of snowfall across the UK based on a tweet comprising your postcode then a 1 to 10 scale of snowfall. But it only records snow fall not depth (in fact it only records what you tell it so its very subjective). I think there are definitely a few changes that would take it forward and make it even more popular.

The Weather Underground (www.wunderground.com) has a fantastic mashup map, based on personal weather station feeds, such as the one here at Redwood, but again, snow is obvious by omission only.

I’m sure in places where snow fall is greater that recording and publishing methods are much further advanced than they are for the typical personal weather station, but I am curious what else I can do. Its likely that these winter conditions are indicative of future winters and that snow fall will be a useful addition to the recording going on here at Redwood.

You can follow the weather here at Redwood on the web site (weather.60redwood.com) and on twitter @RedwoodWeather

There is more snow expected this weekend

Finally, here a few pictures from my office window out over the frozen garden Redwood lake

Posted via email from Steve’s Blog